Tuesday, 2 May 2017

Archive - I Will Fade (John Ov3rblast Remix)

Sasha - Cut Me Down (John Ov3rblast Remix)

Ov3rblast - A Piece Of Me Is In You (Original Mix)

16 Foods That You Can Magically Regrow From Scraps

16 Foods That You Can Magically Regrow From Scraps



Did you know that many fruit and vegetable scraps can magically regrow into a whole new plant? With a little love (and a bit of patience) you can turn your otherwise discarded scraps into a whole new plant ready for you to enjoy a second time around. Remember to start these projects in a sunny, warm, and well-ventilated area for best results. Take a look at these 16 ways to regrow your scraps and start growing today!

Walking from Venice Beach to Santa Monica Pier in Los Angeles, Californi...

The British Museum Is Now Open To Everyone: Take a Virtual Tour and See 4,737 Artifacts, Including the Rosetta Stone | Open Culture

The British Museum Is Now Open To Everyone: Take a Virtual Tour and See 4,737 Artifacts, Including the Rosetta Stone | Open Culture







The British Museum charges nothing for admission, of course, but now the internet has freed it in the geographical sense as well.

“The British Museum recently unveiled the results of its partnership with the Google Cultural Institute (GCI),” writes National Geographic‘s Kristin Romney, “the world’s largest Google Street View of an interior space, covering nine floors and 85 permanent galleries of the museum.” Have a virtual walkthrough, and you’ll pass displays of about 80,000 notable objects; the highlights Romney names include the Lewis Chessmen and cat mummies, the Elgin Marbles, and even architectural features of the museum itself such as the “the yawning expanse of the museum’s Great Court, the largest public square in Europe, with early morning light filtering through the 3,312 glass roof panes.”

Howland Hill Road - 4K Forest Scenic Drive in Redwood & Piano Music

Sounds Natural - 99% Invisible

Sounds Natural - 99% Invisible

That crazy plan to refreeze the Arctic is actually getting a trial run in Switzerland - ScienceAlert

That crazy plan to refreeze the Arctic is actually getting a trial run in Switzerland - ScienceAlert



Back in February, physicists announced an outlandish plan to 're-freeze' the Arctic, by installing 10 million wind-powered pumps over the ice cap to replenish the dwindling sea ice.
The idea was so wild, no one actually thought it would happen, but researchers in Switzerland have just launched a trial that will see if they can sustain an entire glacier through summer using nothing but snow machines.
If the team manages to successfully preserve a small, artificial glacier at the foot of the Diavolezzafirn glacier in the south-eastern part of Switzerland through the year's hottest months, it's hoped that they can apply the technique to the country's natural giant - the Morteratsch glacier.
One of the most massive glaciers in the eastern alps, this vast valley glacier has been retreating fast thanks to rising temperatures, and is currently losing 30 to 40 metres every year.
It could be that the only hope for Switzerland's Morteratsch glacier is thousands of snow machines blasting it with artificial sleet.
If all of this sounds a little far-fetched to you, scientists have actually done the maths, and it is technically feasible to use machines to rebuild glaciers and replenish vanishing sea ice.
Earlier this year, a team led by Arizona State University physicist, Steven Desch, put out a report describing how millions of wind-powered pumps could blast 1.3 metres of water on the surface of the Arctic, adding 1 extra metre (3.2 feet) of sea ice. 
While an extra metre doesn't sound like all that much, they calculated that it would be like pushing time back by 17 years.
The only problem? How mind-bogglingly vast the Arctic region actually is. 
The team calculated that covering just 10 percent of the Arctic would involve erecting millions of pumps, which together would have to spray 7.5 kg per of water (16.5 pounds) every second to achieve 1 extra metre in a year.
"The area of the Arctic Ocean is about 10km2 [3.8 million miles2]," the report stated.
"If the wind-powered pumps are to be distributed across 10 percent of that area, this would necessitate about 10 million wind-powered pumps; if distributed across the entire Arctic, about 100 million would be needed."
In order to build a fleet of 100 million pumps to save the entire Arctic, you'd need more steel than the US produces in a entire year.
All that considered, there was no way in hell the plan was ever going to be funded, but the much smaller version proposed for Switzerland could actually have some legs.
Glacier expert Johannes Oerlemans of Utrecht University in the Netherlands calculated that around 4,000 snow machines could help the Morteratsch glacier not only stop retreating, but actually grow in the coming decades.
The basic idea is that the ice on the glacier is now being exposed to sunlight, but if they could cover the ice in thick, artificial snow, it could reflect the light away before it ever gets to the vulnerable ice layers below.
Oerlemans presented his plan at the recent annual meeting of the European Geosciences Union in Vienna, Austria.
"Looking at previous work showing that natural snow can help glaciers grow, he concluded that the glacier could regain up to 800 metres of length within 20 years if it had a covering," Andy Coghlan reports for New Scientist.
"He worked out that just a few centimetres of artificial snow blown onto a 0.5-square-kilometre plateau high up the glacier each summer could be enough to protect the ice beneath."
Of course, the plan isn't as colossal as the Arctic one, but it's still huge, and would require a lot of funding, but Oerlemans and his team are quietly confident.
For the past decade, the Diavolezzafirn glacier has been having artificial snow added to it over the winter months to improve the ski season. Locals in the area have seen as this extra snow helped the small glacier grow by up to 8 metres in the past 10 years, and they actually raised the US$100,000 needed to launch the trial run this summer.
If the trial successfully maintains the test section at the Diavolezzafirn glacier's foot through the summer months - the artificial snow usually melts down, only to be rebuilt for the return of the ski season later in the year - the team will need millions of euros to launch the actual Morteratsch rescue plan.
But the result could be revolutionary - it would be the first large-scale attempt to do something like this anywhere in the world.
With a major report coming out just last week, in which more than 90 scientists urged that the Arctic is "unravelling" as we speak, our only chance right now is to think big. 
Let's hope we can find enough snow machines.

[HD] The Colour Theory: Full Documentary

Los Angeles time lapse photography "PANO LA" by Joe Capra aka Scientifan...

https://www.instagram.com/ov3rblast



https://www.instagram.com/ov3rblast

Obsolete — Full Documentary Official (2016)

Scientists Now Claim “Dark Energy” – Which Makes Up 68% Of The Entire Cosmos – May Be Totally Imaginary





Dark energy is not so dark anymore…or existent. A new study published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society asserts that the enigmatic dark energy doesn’t really exist. For the last two decades, it was believed that 68% of the universe was made from dark energy (in contrast, dark matter makes up 27% of the universe, while “ordinary” matter only accounts for 5%). This dark energy explained that little something-something that described the motion of stars within galaxies, including the acceleration rate in which the universe expanded. And yes, that phrase was used intentionally: the fact is, astronomers had no real clue what they were seeing or how it influenced the universe.
According to conventional theories of astrophysics, the universe was formed by the Big Bang almost 14 billion years ago. It has been expanding ever since. This is based on Hubble’s law, which states that on average, the speed in which a galaxy  moves away from us is proportional to its distance. The velocity of this recession can be seen by looking at lines in the spectrum of a galaxy, which shift to red the faster the galaxy is moving away. It is this mathematical model that proved that the universe is expanding and that it began life as a small point. Still, scientists were never able to explain the force that drove the acceleration.
Observations of the explosions of white dwarf stars in binary systems, called Type Ia supernovae in the 1990s, “confirmed” to scientists that there was a third previously-unknown component to the universe. Astronomers named this component dark energy.
This new study questions these assumptions. Lead author, Ph.D. student Gábor Rácz of Eötvös Loránd University in Hungary, says that relying on the conventional models of cosmology ignores the uniform density of matter itself. This is because scientists rely too much on approximations rather than seeing other possibilities.
Co-author of the study, Dr. László Dobos explains in an article published in ScienceDaily.com“Einstein’s equations of general relativity that describe the expansion of the universe are so complex mathematically that for a hundred years no solutions accounting for the effect of cosmic structures have been found. We know from very precise supernova observations that the universe is accelerating, but at the same time we rely on coarse approximations to Einstein’s equations which may introduce serious side-effects, such as the need for dark energy, in the models designed to fit the observational data.”

The darkness of illusion

Is the universe’s acceleration just driven by mere variations or inhomogeneities? If the researchers are to be believed, this could explain one of the biggest mysteries in physics with nothing more than the old-familiar general theory of relativity explained by Albert Einstein years ago. Naturally, some researchers remain skeptical. Tom Giblin, a Computational Cosmologist at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio said in an article in ScienceMag.com, “I would love if inhomogeneities explained dark energy…[but] I don’t see any evidence from our simulations to expect it to be as big an effect as they see here.”
The issue at hand is that the new study questions computational models that have been used for 20 years. Simply speaking, cosmologists relied on two equations to describe how the universe evolved. One defines how matter coalesces into galaxies, while the other (known as the  Friedmann–Lemaître–Robertson–Walker (FLRW) metric) is based on Einstein’s theory of gravity and hopes to explain how much the universe has expanded at any given time. Dark energy models relied on FLRW to explain its function. Needless to say, astronomers have had varying results. This, the new research says, is because FLRW equations apply only to a smooth and homogeneous universe. This is already questionable, considering that general relativity says that mass and energy warp space-time. Thus, in principle, inhomogeneities are more likely to affect the universe’s expansion rather than calculated simulations.
The new study’s computational model on inhomogeneities suggest that studying these vectors are more relevant to understanding the universe than previous research. Still, experts argue for more data. “Mainstream cosmology has done such a bad job of solving the dark energy problem that it will likely be some non mainstream idea like this that does,” says Giblin. However, he adds, “I don’t know if this is the one.”
Learn more about the universe and space technology by reading the articles at Space.news.

Chaga: This Anti-Aging Superfood Can Help Prevent Cancer, Improve The Immune System

 Did you know that the most antioxidant-potent superfood known is a mushroom that grows inside the bark of birch trees? This superfood has shown benefits in fighting cancer, boosting the immune system, improving cholesterol levels and staving off aging.Inontus obliquuus, commonly known as chaga, has been used as a food and traditional medicine for hundreds of years. It grows only in cold regions where the temperature drops below -30° F for more than two months every year, such as Northern Canada, Alaska, Siberia, Scandinavia and the northern Baltic region. It takes seven to 20 years for the chaga cap to mature to the point where it can be harvested.A traditional superfoodChaga has traditionally been used as food by indigenous Siberians, as an ingredient in soups, stews and daily beverages. In Russia, Eastern Europe and Northern Canada, it has a long use as a traditional cancer cure. Eastern Europeans also prize it for its ability to cure respiratory diseases.Chaga also has a long history of use in China and Korea, where it is typically consumed as a tea. In Korea, this tea is thought to regulate energy and fight stress. Chaga is also often used topically as a treatment for psoriasis and eczema.Scientific research is just starting to bear out the truth of this folk wisdom.Analyses of chaga have shown that it has the highest antioxidant potency of any superfood, and is particularly rich in the antioxidant super-oxide dismutase (SOD), a chemical that occurs in the body but naturally declines after age 30. Antioxidants fight chronic disease and help stave off the effects of aging by freeing the body of the free radicals that can damage cells and DNA.People who consume it daily don’t get cancerChaga is also rich in Beta-D-Glucans, which are known to help regulate the body’s immune response – turning it up or down as necessary to fight infection or prevent allergy and autoimmune diseases. This immune-regulating function may account for chaga’s effectiveness at treating ulcers, which are caused by bacteria, and tumors, which can also sometimes be cleared by the immune system.In investigating the potential anticancer benefits of chaga, modern researchers have found that the regions of Russia that have the highest use of chaga have almost no incidence of cancer.Studies have shown that SOD can dramatically boost survival among patients undergoing radiation therapy for cancer, as well as reducing scarring and toxicity and boosting wound healing. Research also suggests that chaga activates immune cells that help fight cancer initiation.Chaga is also rich in lanosterol and inotodiols, which have been shown to directly hamper cancer cells in laboratory studies. Lanosterol may also help kill viruses.Chaga contains betulin and betulinic acid, which are currently being studied for their effects on cancer and viruses, and have been shown to support healthy cholesterol levels. Betulinic acid in particular has been shown to break down LDL (“bad”) cholesterol in the blood.Because chaga grows only in the wild in a few specific regions, most people who want to reap its benefits will need to purchase the mushrooms (or tinctures or capsules made from them) at a local health food store or online.If you get hold of the fresh mushroom, one of the most popular ways to consume it is in the form of tea. Simply grind one 10g chunk into powder, place it in a tea infuser, and steep in 400ml of hot water for at least 5 minutes (the longer the better, from a health perspective). Chaga can be bitter, so most people sweeten the tea before drinking.If you can only find dried chaga, traditional ways to prepare it include soaking it in vodka or simmering it for several hours and mixing it with ginger ale for taste.To heal the skin and protect it from aging, you can make a cream from chaga, raw beeswax and spice oils.